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        Special Waste Management

        Waste Tires — Nevada developed a waste tire management plan in 1994 and adopted regulations in Nevada Administrative Code Ch. 444A.200 to 444A.470. The regulations establish a permit requirement for waste tire management facilities, a registration requirement for commercial waste tire haulers and requirements for manifesting commercially transported tires. See guidance documents and application forms .

        Medical Waste — Nevada has adopted the US Dept. Of Transportation definition for regulated medical waste found in 49CFR Part 173, App. G. Other pertinent regulations are at Nevada Administrative Code 444.646 and 444.662. If medical waste has been treated by incineration, autoclaving or an alternative method approved by the solid waste management authority, it can be managed as ordinary solid waste with no special requirements. Special requirements apply to the storage, collection, labeling, transporting and disposal of regulated medical waste. Nevada regulations allow the direct disposal by landfilling of untreated medical waste. Commercial treatment facilities exist in the Reno and Las Vegas areas, but not in rural areas of the state. Click here to see our fact sheet on medical waste.

        Asbestos Waste — Nevada Administrative Code 444.965 to 444.976 contain regulations governing the disposal of asbestos. Friable asbestos waste is subject to regulatory standards concerning handling, transportation, record-keeping, notification and disposal. The program for certification of asbestos waste contractors is administered by the Nevada Division of Industrial Relations/Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement Section at (775) 824-4600.

        For more information concerning asbestos visit the EPA websit: Asbestos in Your Home or find additional information here: Home Asbestos Safety Guide.

        Mercury Waste — Mercury is a metal, the only one that is liquid at room temperature. It is very dense, and has a high surface tension. It is used in many household products because it conducts electricity, expands uniformly with temperature, and easily forms bonds with other metals. Mercury has toxic effects on humans plus its pollution can contaminate our air, water, and soil. For additional information click here for our web page

        Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs (CFL) — A CFL is a very energy efficient lamp and have become popular. A concern is that a CFL bulb generally contains an average of 5 mg of mercury (about one-fifth of that found in the average watch battery, and less than 1/100th of the mercury found in an amalgam dental filling). The net benefit of using the more energy efficient lamp is positive, and this is especially true if the mercury in the fluorescent lamp is kept out of the waste stream when the lamp expires. For additional information click here

        Automotive Wastes — Used oil and batteries are prohibited from disposal in landfills. Many automotive retail stores accept these wastes from the public. Many landfills also have collection sites.

        Biosolids — NDEP supports biosolids re-use in order to take advantage of this beneficial soil amendment and to keep material with high liquid content out of the State's landfills. Contact the NDEP Bureau of Water Pollution Control to apply for a biosolids reuse permit. Many disposal sites do accept these wastes, but they must be dried or otherwise solidified prior to disposal.

        Lead Based Paint – Lead based paint is authorized to go into a municipal landfill if it is generated in the household by either the home owner or a hired contractor in accordance with EPA Memorandum RO 14459.  In the State of Nevada, in accordance with NAC 444.8632, all non-household generated LBP is required to have a waste determination made (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure preferred) on the hazardous characteristics of the leachable lead.  The federal threshold for lead is 5.0 mg/l.  Any analysis results that exceed this federal threshold is required to be disposed of in a permitted hazardous waste landfill which is authorized to accept lead containing wastes.

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